Archive | January, 2012

Best Property of the Year

11 Jan

I have just come across this stunning property (featured in Livingetc magazine), which won the ‘Best Property of the Year’ award at the Northern Design Awards in Manchester. The property is situated in Cumbria (the beautiful county in which I grew up) and was transformed from its once derelict state by Donald Insall Associates. The images below are sourced from the Northern Design Awards Website where you can have a look at lots of fantastic designs from 2007-11. The first two images show the completed building, the third image shows the building prior to transformation.

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Tom Hardwidge

9 Jan

‘Arthrobots’… what an unusual find! These mechanical insects otherwise know as ‘Arthrobots’ are created by Tom Hardwidge. The pieces are made from deactivated ammunition, pocket watch parts (similar to those I have collected for my own project), a range of metals and tiny nuts and bolts. I decided to write this post as the sculptures are not only intricate and interesting to look at, but my current project is also inspired by a combination of mechanical and organic elements.

 

Jeremiah Goodman

9 Jan

I love reading magazines such as House to Home, Livingetc and Wallpaper and I am frequently browsing online blogs dreaming of how I will decorate my own home, that is when I am able to afford my own home! I could talk at length about patterns, accessories, furniture and lighting, in fact I think I will begin to post more about interior design, but for now I am going to share some fantastic interior paintings created by the renowned artist Jeremiah Goodman.

Mechanical and Organic (Fruit & Vegetable) Photography

7 Jan

Before the light began to fade yesterday afternoon I set about taking some photographs that combined fruit and vegetables with mechanical parts, an idea that I discussed in a post earlier this week. The outcome was unfortunately not as good as I hoped it would be. I have 10-15 reasonable images but I feel a lot of improvement can be made; as a result I will be carrying out attempt 2 soon! I experimented with mushrooms, potatoes, radish, plum tomatoes and cucumber. I particularly liked using the cucumber and radish as both vegetables have a vibrant skin and translucent inner flesh, perfect for layering. Below are some of the images I have taken so far, but I certainly hope to improve upon these next week. I think I need to be more inventive in terms of how I prepare the fruit or vegetable and I also need to think more carefully about the background of the photograph.

Disassembly Photography

7 Jan

I have a box full of wrist and pocket watches and an array of miscellaneous mechanical parts that I am using for a current textile design project. Some of the pocket watches are complete although no longer working and on a number of occasions I have considered taking apart one or two of the watches in order to see all of the components. Towards the end of my current project, when I no longer need the watches in their entirety perhaps I will attempt to take them apart and see exactly what is in there, but for now here are some interesting photographs of disassembled objects by Todd McLellan.

Gregory Euclide

5 Jan

Gregory Euclide creates pieces I could look at for hours. Each piece appears to be incredibly complex and intricate. I particularly like the 3-Dimensional pieces which I have chosen to include images of below, but the website found here, is definitely worth having a look at as there are far too many amazing pieces to include on my blog!

Alexis Anne Mackenzie

5 Jan

The next few posts will show the work of artists, designers and creatives who I have discovered over the past few weeks. As collage is an area in which I am interested and a method that I use regularly to create designs within my sketchbook, I have previously blogged about the work of other collage artists but the subject area is very diverse. I find the work of Alexis Anne Mackenzie, particularly interesting and unusual. This is because the elements combined within the pieces (shown below) not only form subtle lettering but initially appear to portray beautiful organic images or patterns, this is until you realise there are ‘dark’ or ‘ugly’ elements such as eyeballs used within the pieces.

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